Aporia

640x516x2.jpg?auth=1ed24f8a11f133b7e5c46Aporia is a collection of installations by South Korean artist Lee Jung. Each of the installations consist of a sentence or phrase spelled out in neon against an empty, natural background. The word "aporia" comes from a Greek word meaning "dead end street" and the Oxford English Dictionary defines it as: "An irresolvable internal contradiction or logical disjunction in a text, argument, or theory." The name of the piece combined with the specific matter phrases suggests the artist's complex, if not conflicted, thoughts about the concept of love.

Doubt

[video src=https://vimeo.com/161752738]In Doubt, artist Carsten Höller challenges our perceptions of reality through coded sequences of light and spatio-temporal illusions. His goal was to blur the lines between spectator and performer within a work of art, while instilling a deep feeling of doubt inside us. The installation begins as a single hallway of light, which subsequently divides itself into two paths, each of which is individually illuminated by either yellow or green lights. Once a spectator chooses a path, they are presented with a multi-level maze of sorts, which combines different sequences of light projection with moments of darkness to challenge our perceptual framework.

Force of Nature

tumblr_nock79w2XF1qav3uso2_r1_540.gif?zoIn April 2015, Nike released its revolutionary kinetic digital art project, Force of Nature, for the Nike Innovation Summit at Truman Brewery in London. The work was created in collaboration with Field, a London-based design studio. By stepping onto a treadmill and beginning to create movement, the participating runner is presented with a fluctuating shower of stunning, multicolored sparks, similar to an energy “mirror” of themselves, created by the movement put forth by him or her on the treadmill. The flux of lights is meant to imitate the runner’s motion and turn the human body into a digital art piece. [1]. The work recalls earlier artworks, including Nancy Paterson's Bicycle TV (1989) and Jeffery Shaw's Legible City (1989-91), both of which used a bicycle as the interface by which the user's activity generates an animated video environment.

Nocturnal Flow

Erwin Redl’s large-scale light installation Nocturnal Flow presents itself as a sea of LEDs stretching from floor to ceiling of the University of Washington’s Allen Center. Composed of over 10,000 individual light units whose intensity varies through time, the grid-like work serves both to emphasize the verticality of the space in which it is housed, but also to accommodate a natural motion birthed from sterility. The use of environmentally-reponsive sensors also imbues the work with a streak of subjectivity, as it can be perceived in contrasting ways depending not only on angle of view, but also time of day or year.

“Remagine” by Olafur Elisson

(Source: MoMA)   Created by Olafur Eliasson, “Remagine” has been featured in various exhibitions by the artist. It was first displayed at the Musée d´Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris, France in 2002, then in “Take your time” at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, 2007, and finally in an […]

Nocturnal Flow

"Nocturnal Flow" is an installation created by artist Erwin Redl, who has done a number of similar pieces around the world involving LED lights. [1] Nocturnal Flow is housed in the atrium of the University of Washington's Paul G. Allen Center and consists of a grid of 17,400 LED lights, which cover the 85-foot brick […]

Tribute in Light

“More recently, light has been used as an artistic medium to illuminate a metaphorical passage between the earth and the heavens.” [1] Tribute in Light is not only beautiful aesthetically, but also beautiful in content as it paid a tribute to the victims of 9/11. The NY Daily News describes the work: “The […]

Five Words In Blue Neon

Five Words in Blue Neon by Joseph Kosuth FIVE WORDS IN BLUE NEON (above image) is the exact description of what this work displays. This glorious, florescent glow of blue neon spelling the simple phrase “FIVE WORDS IN BLUE NEON” contains a particular aura in what this work portrays.[1] With the work displayed in a […]

Round Rainbow

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Random Screen

Random Screen is a mechanical thermodynamic screen that the user can’t control and that functions without any electricity. Conventional tea candles illuminate and generate the changes on the 5×5 pixel screen. (early version 4×4) This work is one of a series of low-tech screen projects that was originally inspired by the Blinkenlights media façade of […]

Continuel – Lumiere – Cylinder

According to artist Julio LeParc, a member of GRAV in Paris, our “first experiments with light were conducted in 1959: We place the light in small boxes which reproduced, multiplied and combined with the screens made of Plexiglas slates, prisms, squares and circle shapes, using a scale of 14 colours. Like in other experiments it […]

77 Million Paintings

[video src=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biKfLio3rWU height:210 align:left] In 2009, Brian Eno projected 77 Million Paintings onto the distinctive white sails of the the Sydney Opera House (1973), the architectural landmark designed by architect Jorn Utzon and designated by UNESCO as a world heritage site in 2007. Through the use of self-generating software, 300 images hand-drawn by renowned artist/composer Brian Eno were randomly cut-up, the pieces rearranged and realigned in an endless variety of ways, hence the title of the trancelike projection.  Interwoven with the projected images was a soundtrack, creating “mesmerizing soundscape.” As Eno says, “by allowing ourselves to let go of the world that we have to be part of every day, and to surrender to another kind of world, we’re allowing imaginative processes to take place.”

Camera Lucida

[video src=http://vimeo.com/11140136 height:220 align:left]Camera Lucida is an interactive “sonic observatory” that directly converts sound waves into light by employing a phenomenon called sonoluminescence. The project was conceived both as an artwork and as a musical instrument that allows its player to see and shape sounds while moving through space….

The project began as a speculative reverie on observing sound waves with the naked eye. The idea of using a gas that would luminesce when irradiated by sound converted into voltage was very appealing to us. However, as soon as we came upon the phenomenon of sonoluminescence, it became quite clear that we had struck virgin soil.

Igloo di Giap

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Vectorial Elevation: Relational Architecture 4

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s>Rafael Lozano-Hemmer’s Vectorial Elevation is “an interactive art project originally designed to celebrate the arrival of the year 2000 in Mexico City’s Zócalo Square. The website www.alzado.net enabled any Internet user to design light sculptures over the city’s historic centre, with eighteen searchlights positioned around the square. These searchlights, whose powerful beams could be seen within a 15 kilometers radius, were controlled by an online 3D simulation program and visualised by digital cameras. A personalised webpage was produced for every participant with images of their design and information such as their name, dedication, place of access and comments. These web pages were completely uncensored, allowing participants to leave a wide variety of messages, including love poems, football scores, Zapatista slogans and twenty-seven marriage proposals. In Mexico, the project attracted 800,000 participants from 89 countries over the course of its two-week duration.”[1]

ACCESS

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Cinechromatic Art Machine

The first Cinechromatic Art Machine was presented in the First International Biennial in Sao Paulo, Brazil -1951.

GlowFlow

GlowFlow is a visually and auditive reactive environment. In a dark room 4 neon tube are mounted, in order to create the misleading impression that the room is narrowing and slopy.

Light Ballet

In 1959, Otto Piene created the work Light Ballet, which annouces his concern with the elements.