$8,793 Worth of [Digital] Art

merkske_waelder_worth01.jpgIn art critic Pau Waelder's ebook, titled $8,793 Worth of [Digital] Art, he pairs each of the 159 images of works of art lifted directly from the online art marketplace S[edition]'s storefront with either an authentic or unauthentic "certificate of authenticity," which is intended to only be given upon the official purchase of each copy of an art piece by an individual.  However, a simple flaw in the website presentation allowed Waelder to reproduce the certificate - a blank example copy for each art piece is shown on the website proper, which Waelder copied and used to forge some of the certificates in his collection while the rest he officially purchased.  These copies are indistinguishable from the real deal, forcing the reader to distrust what they see on the page as fact - an obvious metaphor for what debatably constitutes as "owning an official piece of art" in the contemporary digital landscape.

Indeed, if one were to compare this certificate with any featured on S[edition]'s website, can any difference be found? (Save for the art and artists' names, of course.)

Eyeborg (Neil Harbisson's Cyborg Antenna)

Neil_Harbisson_cyborgist.jpgNeil Harbisson is a cyborg artist based in New York City. He is described as a cyborg artist because his artwork his artwork is concerned with the concept of cyborgism but also because he himself is technically a cyborg. He has an antenna implant, which he calls "the Eyeborg." This device is implanted in his skull and was designed to extend the limitations of human color perception. Although he was born completely color blind, he can can now even see infrared and ultraviolet colors that are invisible to humans.

Biometric Mirror

 Lucy McRae's Biometric Mirror is an interactive art installation. Viewers are invited to casually glance into one of the installation’s mirrors, which then runs artificial intelligence software to analyze and “perfect” the patron’s physical facial features. Physical attributes of the face including age, gender, and race are quantified and modified through use of an algorithm to produce a Marquardt Mask, or a more “physically perfect” version of ones face.The participant is therefore shown, face-to-face a simulated version of themselves, a doppelganger that is supposedly better, but eerily "off."

 

Conway's Game of Life, sunSurgeAutomata, and the Conway Quartet

Gospers_glider_gun.gifConway's Game of Life is a cellular automaton (a model that attempts to replicate the behavior of living cells) developed by British mathematician John Horton Conway in 1970. It takes the form of a grid with pixels that can either be in two states, on or off, or alive and dead since this is supposed to a model replicating the behavior of biological cells. Some artists have taken cellular automata (either Conway's Game of Life or similar ones) and used them to create new pieces, such as Dupuis' Conway Quartet and Scaletti's sunSurgeAutomata.

PHAROS

Rapper, singer, comedian, writer, director, and producer Donald Glover, aka Childish Gambino, is no stranger to experimentation when it comes to art and bridging the gap between music and technology. Moreover, he utilizes technology to create not only an experience for fans but to interact with them as well. For PHAROS, Childish Gambino utilized a combination of motion capture technology, CGI, and virtual reality to create an immersive 3-Day musical experience that showcased a new way to enjoy and connect to an artist live on stage.

Likeness

Adam Ferriss’s art installation from June 2018, Likeness, takes one person’s face and transforms it into another. It “reimagines face-filtering and remolds people’s appearances in real time.” Likeness, curated by Alex Czetwertynski, another digital artist and curator, was produced for Google IO 2018 in the Museum of Developer Art and commissioned by UCLA Conditional Studio. Ferriss began his installation by presenting the computer two sets of images: generic photographs of people, and what Ferriss calls “label maps” that “identify and highlight the different facial features, like eyes, eyebrows, jawline, mouth, and nose, present in the photographs." 

Pages