Mechanical Parts

 Mechanical Parts is a series of illustrations drawn by a robot programmed by artist Matthias Dörfelt. His machine, named 'Robo Fabers,' rolls across the paper and creates drawings autonomously, while adhering to a set of... interesting guidelines Dörfelt programmed it with. As he told Gizmodo, "basically [Robo Fabers] is doodling connectors—think of it as robot genitalia—as a first step of planing reproduction." The machine randomly arranges various permutations of components as specified by Dörfelt. Most noticeably, shapes clearly resembling hairy and shorn testicles, phalluses, sperm, holes, and eggs are are visible in the drawings pictured above.

A Bell for Every Minute

A Bell for Every Minute is a sound installation by artist Stephen Vitiello, located on the High Line in New York City. Vitiello recorded 59 bells from all over New York City. These include landmark bells such New York Stock Exchange bell, the Dreamland Bell, the United Nation’s Peace Bell, and more common, everyday bells such as bike bells, diner bells, and church bells. Vitiello placed speakers throughout the 14th Street Passage, a tunnel between West 13th and West 14th Streets. Each minute, a bell rings from the speakers. At the top of each hour, all of the different bells ring at once in a chorus that fills the space.

Polygon Playground

Polygon Playground is a 'dynamic lounge object,' incorporating 3D projection technologies and sensors to detect movement and proximity of people in the room. The physical structure is such that up to 40 people may climb, rest, or walk around it, while sensors cause the 'landscape' to continuously change as as long as there is human presence. Often the imagery responds to movements, so running across the top of the structure may cause it to highlight the participants footsteps. Other motifs include grids, filling with water, orbs or color that can be 'kicked' around, and various abstract color forms.

Trace

Bolygo’s take on the self portrait, Trace, is a 2008 sculptural device by the artist, which connects conventional ideas of sculpture, especially of the human form, to contemporary notions of topography and transcription. The piece involves a rotating cast of the artist's head traversed by an extension of a complex but completely mechanical device, which records depth onto a circular piece of paper rotating at the same rate as the head. The artist's own head is then transformed into a compelling topographical map of itself under rotation. The resulting image is noticeably a head, but a heavily distorted one, appearing almost like an image from a spirograph, an evolving concentric diagram of recorded depth.

Given Time

In Given Time, artist Nathaniel Stern utilizes different forms of media, but maintains his focus on the relationship between bodies and art. This this video installation, Stern created two avatars in Second Life who stand apart facing one another. Their location within the in-game world is never disclosed, but they do occupy virtual space somewhere. In physical space, the two avatars are projected onto screens opposite one another in the gallery, as in Second Life. Viewers can approach the two virtual performers, while they hover as video projections, forever staring at one another. These representational characters are in fact, nobody. They exist only in the virtual plane, yet they are brought into existence via light and electricity.

Compressionism

6206912899_5645817a99.jpgPart photography, part performance art filtered through an algorithmic structure, Nathaniel Stern's Compressionism uses a document scanner as the tool of choice, which takes on the dual roles of paintbrush and camera: as the scanner bulb moves along its path, the artist follows his own path hovering over various objects and textures. Sometimes linearly, sometimes erratically, he moves according to his own performative instincts. With this kinetic approach, Stern bridges a certain gap between his body and the end result.

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