Charged Environments

One Beat One Tree

[video src=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ie80LvSpIpk align:right height:220]One Beat One Tree by Belgian artist  Naziha Mestaoui, displays a world of innovation and technology, and its ability to simulate the spectacle of life as well as growth, in an interactive and heartfelt simulation.  The installation consists of a projection of digital forests on cityscapes, bringing the technology as well as the nature into a perceived symbiotic relationship.  However, the real magic of this piece comes with the interactive capabilities of this virtual environment, in which the participants are given a heartbeat sensor that syncs with their phones[1], where with each beat, the virtual trees seem to sprout and continue to grow in the virtual space.

I Promise to Love You

  • por

I Promise to Love You by Tracey Emin is a series of neon artworks, comprised of six written love messages animated on fifteen billboards in Times Square in February 2013.,  The glowing words slowly spell themselves out, as if being written by a ghost or an invisible presence, demonstrating the power of love.

LOVE

Love is Alexander Milov's debut art piece for the Burning Man Festival. The sculpture calls into question how one is to truly"discover one's genuine self in a media-saturated world." Not only does the sculpture itself send a message to its audience, but the material that is used to create the sculpture is also part of the message as well.The outer figures represent the independence and solitude of adulthood. The rebar cages from which they are fashioned represents how society traps our inner selves. By contrast, the children trapped inside suggested the possibility of connection and illumination.

Aporia

640x516x2.jpg?auth=1ed24f8a11f133b7e5c46Aporia is a collection of installations by South Korean artist Lee Jung. Each of the installations consist of a sentence or phrase spelled out in neon against an empty, natural background. The word "aporia" comes from a Greek word meaning "dead end street" and the Oxford English Dictionary defines it as: "An irresolvable internal contradiction or logical disjunction in a text, argument, or theory." The name of the piece combined with the specific matter phrases suggests the artist's complex, if not conflicted, thoughts about the concept of love.

Modell 5

[video src=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ATWljMbvVTg]In Modell 5 by Granular Synthesis (Kurt Hentschläger and Ulf Langheinrich) performer Akemi Takeya tells the story of her life. The four-channel video premiered at the ICA in London in 1994, where four projections revealed Takeya's expressions moving rapidly in different directions, with her voice also synchopated algorithmically, using a technique known as "granular synthesis" by the artists. The work has been described as "one of the most beautiful experiments in bringing digital video to a theatrical setting." Audiences are amazed by how the installation animates the subject's story is simultaneously jarring and visually arresting.

We Are All Made of Light

[video src=https://vimeo.com/313413541 height:200 align: left]We Are All Made Of Light is an immersive art exhibition which exemplifies the interconnectedness that we share with our fellow humans and the universe itself. The releasing of the installation coincided with Seattle’s BOREALIS: a festival of light, debuting in October, 2018 in South Lake Union and across Seattle. The work was created by the Seattle-based artist Maja Petrić who set out to demonstrate the thought that we are all just individuals in vast and expansive universe, yet we all share some form of expanded consciousness.

External Cybernetics

[video src=[video src=https://youtu.be/I0lAcvfc5uU]] Geoffrey Drake-Brockman is an Australian artist who explores a concept known as external cybernetics in which all of his installations require human interaction in order to function. Geoffrey's work in a sense pays homage to the work of Groupe de recherche d'art visual or GRAV from the 1960s. However, Drake-Brockman's approach to external cybernetics gives a deeper, more in-depth look into the behavior of the spectator/participant. He utilizes interactivity to create a world in which the artist is the spectator and the spectator is the artist encouraging creativity in the purest form. 

Roomba Paintings

Roombas, or iRobots, have cleaned our carpets and floors since the 1990s [1] and have been an excellent innovation toward better vacuums ever since. In 2006, sculptor Bobby Zokaites saw more than just a better vacuum, he saw a potential tool to create art. What do you get when you take the vacuum out of the Roomba and add a paintbrush? Roomba Paintings!

PHAROS

[video src=video:https://youtu.be/u4zSkxh1-Hk?t=1881]Rapper, singer, comedian, writer, director, and producer Donald Glover, aka Childish Gambino, is no stranger to experimentation when it comes to art and bridging the gap between music and technology. Moreover, he utilizes technology to create not only an experience for fans but to interact with them as well. For PHAROS, Childish Gambino utilized a combination of motion capture technology, CGI, and virtual reality to create an immersive 3-Day musical experience that showcased a new way to enjoy and connect to an artist live on stage.

Doubt

[video src=https://vimeo.com/161752738]In Doubt, artist Carsten Höller challenges our perceptions of reality through coded sequences of light and spatio-temporal illusions. His goal was to blur the lines between spectator and performer within a work of art, while instilling a deep feeling of doubt inside us. The installation begins as a single hallway of light, which subsequently divides itself into two paths, each of which is individually illuminated by either yellow or green lights. Once a spectator chooses a path, they are presented with a multi-level maze of sorts, which combines different sequences of light projection with moments of darkness to challenge our perceptual framework.

Migration (Empire) by Doug Aitken

  • por

[video src=[video src=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JZ6cJaGm79E]]American hotel rooms are where Doug Aitken’s short film Migration (Empire) takes place. The artist unexpectedly mixed the scenes of motel room settings with wild animals. As the animal explore the ubiquitous industrial interiors, the film explores the relationship between these American untamed wilderness and our human involvement of industrialization. The film includes many beautiful but also cruel scenes, such as a fox wandering in the motel room and noticing the view outside of the window is different because of the mesh screen; a deer drinking water from a swimming pool; an otter bathing in a bath tub. The film shifts continuously shifts to another animal, another occupant with a new room, suggesting the homelessness embodied by the motel room.

The Island of Pal

Anne-Farrell_The-Island-of-Pal-copy-940xLittle red skiffs float on undulating waters along with armchairs, fully made beds, and spiraling severed horses' heads in the throbbing air. Three toy horses are posed on synthetic turf in a theatrically raked trapezoidal corral bordered by tiny rope footlights. No bridles or saddles are ever in view; these are wild horses temporarily and ever-so-lightly penned in by a white picket fence. Enclosed inside the skewed geometry and oblique angles the equine visitors—a palomino named Pal, a buckskin called Bonnie, and her sometimes partner, the black-coated Clyde—are here to entice playmates. Inside a bricolage gilt frame a ten-minute video containing all of these disparate constituents (and new characters too) offers a dream narrative of these fantastical beings, delighting in an idyll of grasslands and wildflowers.

Threads

threads06.jpgThere is something in the wind that is mystical: how it sounds, how it moves things. The ethereal, this effect that leads you to memories because deep inside you want things to last, we cling to what we call the root of our existence and we want to pass this on.

But just as the wind, we do our reinterpretations of phenomena, and disappear. We are forever stuck in the cycle of our perception weaving our past and colliding with our present.

Wave UFO

[video src= https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8QbcyKwWNo align: left height: 200] Combining her love of sci-fi and her penchant for installations, artist Mariko Mori created a unique, encapsulating experience that literally transports the viewers to another world in Wave UFO. Mariko's goal is to make the audience experience what it would be like to go to another planet. Inside of the pod, visitors are given "a set of electrodes that gather brainwave data" [1] that feed to a video monitor inside of the pod. This is played alongside a second video screen, and those two coupled together represent both sides of the brain's psychology and functions. Viewers recline in padded seats placed around the pod, in which they watch the two screens. After the seven minutes of footage end, visitors disembark via the staircase.

A Sound Garden

[video src=https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aGUPZc53cQ height: 180 align: right] A Sound Garden, by Douglas Hollis, is an "aeolean" sound sculpture comprised of 12 tower-like structures. An aeolean instrument is one that wind-driven, a reference to Aeolus, the Greek god of wind. The structures contain pipes that generate a wide variety of sounds, depending on wind speed and direction [2]. As this area is subject to frequent winds of varying intensity, A Sound Garden the visitor will almost always hear it in action and may be treated to a dynamic wind-driven concert as the sounds respond to changes in the winds. A Sound Garden is also notable as the inspiration for the eponymous Seattle grunge band, Soundgarden.

Rain Room

[video src= http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkvazIZx-F0 align:right height:220] Rain Room is an interactive installation piece created by rAndom International, a multimedia artistic team based in London. This artwork seeks to emulate the experience of rain in an indoor setting; within a large room, drops of water fall from the ceiling, creating a constant, thunderous downpour. When a person is introduced to this space, they are monitored by 3D depth cameras that inform Rain Room’s software system of the person’s exact location, causing the rain directly above the individual to cease. As a result of this technology, a person remains dry as they move throughout the space.

Iris

This article is a STUB please make edits and adjustments as suggested on Wikipedia to make it more robust.  Thanks! Iris by Les Levine … Leer más »Iris

«Fly» by rAndom International

  • por

[video src=http://vimeo.com/31013833 width:400 align:right] According to its creators, the art/design collective rAndom International, «Fly studies the movement of objects and insects within a confined space. An abstract representation of a fly is held captive inside a glass box, centrally ensnared by eight cables. The behaviour of this ‘fly’ is controlled by a unique and autonomous algorithm, accurately simultating the observed behaviour of real flies.The ‘fly’ has the freedom to move anywhere within its box, but lacks spatial reference.»

30 Days of Running in Place

http://www.artpractical.com/uploads/reviews/_1246_1246/AhmedBasiony.jpgAhmed Basiony‘s 30 Days of Running in Place was first presented at the Why Not exhibition in Cairo in 2010. Basiony performed daily for 30 days in a room enclosed in transparent plastic outside the Cairo Opera House and Palace of Arts – The artist jogged around the room wearing a plastic suit fitted with digital sensors that gathered and wirelessly transmitted data on his movements and physiological parameters – This information was in turn processed and projected on a large screen as an ever-changing visual and aesthetic reflection of the artist’s physical state. As a five-channel installation exhibited at Egyptian Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2011, 30 Days was juxtaposed with videos recorded by Basiony during his participation in the January revolution, until he was killed by gunshot wounds inflicted by Egyptian Police snipers on January 28, 2011.

Polygon Playground

[video src=http://vimeo.com/35134962 height:200 align: left]Polygon Playground is a ‘dynamic lounge object,’ incorporating 3D projection technologies and sensors to detect movement and proximity of people in the room. The physical structure is such that up to 40 people may climb, rest, or walk around it, while sensors cause the ‘landscape’ to continuously change as as long as there is human presence. Often the imagery responds to movements, so running across the top of the structure may cause it to highlight the participants footsteps. Other motifs include grids, filling with water, orbs or color that can be ‘kicked’ around, and various abstract color forms.

Emerge

[video src= http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huvVO18c8Hw align: right height: 220] Emerge relies heavily on viewer interactivity. It features childish cartoon figures that are projected onto a wall. Visitors control the movement of the figures and change them through these interactions. The figures in this piece can be seen as fables about our own daily struggles and activities as they move, expand, and escape. In Emerge each character is inside of an individual chamber and this examines, in a humorous way, the illusions that drive us and the small worlds we confine ourselves to. They cover all available surfaces, reacting to viewer’s intrusions into their small worlds. Emerge is part of artist Brian Knep’s Exempla series and is the first item in the adjacent video.

Healing Pool

 

picKnepHealingPoolWeb-747755.jpg

The Healing Pool by Brian Knep is a six channel interactive video that was installed in 2008. A glowing pool of organic patterns move and pulse. As a person walks across the video the pattern tears and then continues to rebuild itself. However, the pattern never returns to its original form. Each person who walks across this work leaves a scar. The regenerative piece holds a record or a memory of every interaction it has as it constantly evolves. This work is part of Knep’s healing series and this work investigates artificial intelligence and artificial life. Of this work Knep says, “with these pieces I am focusing on the complexity possible with very simple rules. The patterns and their growth are completely emergent phenomena; they arise from the mathematical equations that the software simulates.”